Pass to Power: What is Race and Passing?

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I wonder if this is the beginning of the ‘extinction’ of Black people. It could happen.

smntks

Busted: Rachel Dolezal, Howard Graduate, Head of the NAACP in Spokane, and outspoken black community activist is white.  Outed by a local reporter and mercilessly–and hilariously–taken down on twitter Rachel has sparked lots of chatter about what is race and who can be which one.  Passing points to the essential function of race–that it structures power, not color.  People who pass are not trying to look different, they are trying to change their status.

Race is not in our DNA, it’s a social construct.  That means, despite what your eyes see, there are not different races of people.  In fact, there is no gene for race in the human genome.  Biologically, humans are all part of one family.

So, if race isn’t real, then we can just say racism is dead, yell, “Black President!” and get on with it right?  Wrong.  I mean, have you read this blog before?  Since the birth…

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Why Can’t Rachel Dolezal be Black?

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Why in this ‘white privilege’ world does a white person try this hard to claim being Black?

Old Pair of Genes

The news of Rachel Dolezal as someone who has “pretended” to be black came to light at an interesting time. A few weeks ago, former decathlon gold medalist Bruce Jenner, came out as a trans-woman, henceforth identifying as Caitlyn Jenner. It is broadly accepted among academics that gender and sex are not the same thing; sex is a biological reality, and gender is a social role that someone fills in society. While biological sex tends to be binary (male/female, with the exception of things such hermaphroditism), gender can be seen as more of a spectrum. So how does this relate to race, or does it?

As a preface, I am not suggesting that gender is culturally equivalent to race, though both are cultural constructs and neither are biological realities. Race is a manner in which people are classified by phenotypic characteristics (often skin color), while gender, though often defined by…

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